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Won’t you be my neighbor?

Mason Fine Art, Marcia Wood Gallery and September Gray Fine Art said yes, so with a soft opening in June, these independent galleries — compatible, yet distinct – moved to Buckhead’s Miami Circle.

Mason Fine Art (formerly on Plasters Avenue in Midtown), Marcia Wood (formerly in Castleberry Hill) and September Gray (formerly in Buckhead’s TULA complex) now share a space that’s nearly 10,000 square feet.

It’s about progress, possibilities and collaboration.

Mason’s Mark Karelson sees the move as a way to move Atlanta forward. His connection to Wood’s gallery goes back 30 years, to when they both worked in Virginia–Highland and she sold him his first art piece. They’ve long talked about communities and opportunities for galleries and allied industries to be neighbors. This became the time.

gallery snap july 2021

Atlanta artist Kevin Cole’s “Unfamiliar Steps” (2017), etched aluminum at 24 x 9 inches, is on view now at the new September Gray Gallery.

The move will benefit each gallery’s artists, Wood says, as the owners collaborate rather than competing. “We’re all on each other’s side.” For September Gray, the move means being able to collaborate with like-minded people and get more visibility than her gallery got at TULA.

Here are a few more details.

THE PARTICULARS: 764 Miami Circle, Suite 150, Atlanta (road ends next to Eclipse di Luna). No appointments needed. Galleries open 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Friday; noon–5 p.m. Saturday. Follow them on Instagram at @masonfineart, @marciawoodgallery and @septembergrayart, respectively.

THE LOOK: Organic. It’s an open, elegant, impressive feel-good space. You’re able to experience each gallery without being overwhelmed. You enter immediately into Mason Fine Art. As you move through the room, you’ll see September Fine Art ahead and, around a corner, Marcia Wood Gallery. Each owner is doing their own thing. Mason Fine Art, for instance, has a photography room.

ON VIEW NOW: Mason Fine Art, which specializes in Southern art, is featuring work by American street photographer Vivian Maier (1926–2009) through August 5, plus work by acclaimed artists Benny Andrews (1930–2006) and Larry Walker.

Marcia Wood Gallery, which focuses primarily on contemporary painters, is featuring work by a mix of its artists, including painter/sculptor Joe Peragine, painter/multimedia abstract artist Deborah Dancy and sculptor Mary Engel through September 3.

At September Gray, which spotlights work by established, midcareer and emerging African American and African diasporic artists, you can see art by Atlanta-based painter/sculptor Kevin Cole and French artist Frank Schroeder  through September 3.

gallery snap july 2021

A selection of work from American photographer Vivian Maier is on view now at  Mason Fine Art.

COMING UP: Grand opening reception is 6–9 p.m. September 9. September Gray Fine Art will feature an exhibition by mixed-media/abstract painter Antonio Carreño, through October 28.

Marcia Wood will begin showing Tidal Range, the debut solo exhibition for Argentina-born, Atlanta-based painter María Korol. Mason Fine Art will announce soon.

gallery snap july 2021

“ReBORN #2” (2020) by Jamele Wright Sr., who’s represented by September Gray Fine Art. The piece is mixed media with Georgia clay on Dutch Wax Cloth, at 60 × 132 inches.

MEMORIES (WOOD): In 2010, she and a painter pal cooked up the idea of a print camp and invited six painters (most without printmaking experience) to visit Connecticut. A self-proclaimed closet psychologist, Wood wanted to see how these artists, with very solitary studio practices, would respond in an open space with others. “It was a riot,” she says.

MEMORIES (GRAY): Hosting a 2016 artist talk with New York landscape painter Richard Mayhew, then 92, and Atlanta abstractionist Freddie Styles  about The Nature of Art exhibit. Gray now realizes that speaking with painter/muralist Louis J. Delsarte, for his 2018 Passion and Poetry show, became one of his final exhibitions and talks. He died in 2020. “Collecting art is one thing,’ Gray says, “but to be able to say to artists, ‘We see you, we appreciate you,’ is validating.”

MEMORIES (KARELSON): The time his sculptor mom took him to New York’s Whitney Museum and criticized everything she saw. That made him understand that something can be in a museum and still be subject to critique. “When I discovered outsider art and the art of self-taught artists like Jimmy Lee Sudduth,” he says, “I realized everything didn’t have to be a Leonardo da Vinci. That’s when [art] began to make sense to me.”

 

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