ArtsATL

Your Guide To The Arts In Atlanta

Atlanta Contemporary

Lonnie Holley’s “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship” is prophetic and haunting

One of the works that visitors to Lonnie Holley’s I Snuck Off the Slave Ship (at the Atlanta Contemporary through April 2) are likely to notice first is a large freestanding steel sculpture from 2016 titled The Seer. Holley writes of it in one of the text blocks that offer commentary on most of his artworks, “We are all seers one way or other…. Some of us are even foretellers and are able to see things before they happen.”...

Betting on Increasing Arts Access: Will the Admissions Gamble Pay Off?

While visiting The Broad Museum in Los Angeles over a year ago, I was blown away by both the prominence of featured artists, as well as the fact that I was able to have access to such work for free. Kara Walker, Jeff Koons, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Roy Lichtenstein, Keith Haring, El Anatsui, Jasper Johns, Barbara Kruger and Andy Warhol were just a few of the artists whose work presented by the contemporary art museum founded by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad that opened in September 2015. By showcasing 2,000 works in a 120,000-square-foot, $140-million building, The Broad could easily get away with charging $15 to $20 for admission, I figured, but to offer it for free?...

NEWS: Atlanta Contemporary announces a solo exhibition from Lonnie Holley will open up 2017

Atlanta Contemporary has announced their first solo exhibition by a single artist in three years, an exhibition with Lonnie Holley. The Alabama native, who made his first artwork at age 29, is known for his assemblages of found objects, incorporating natural and man-made ephemera, such as plastic flowers, crosses and steel scraps, into totemic sculptures. “We can make art where we have to,” said Holley in a 2014 profile in The New York Times. “Dr. King, if you remember, wrote a sermon on a piece of toilet paper.”...