Advertisements

Your Source For The Arts In Atlanta

Rising Appalachia
Peia (left) with Rising Appalachia's Leah and Chloe Smith.

Atlanta Soundtrack: Rising Appalachia, Widespread Panic, Ron Pope with Von Grey

Rising Appalachia: “Bold Riley”

Rising Appalachia, the group anchored by sisters Leah and Chloe Smith, has released “Bold Riley” in collaboration with West Coast folk singer Peia. “Bold Riley” traces its roots to the 1600s and British shipping crews that plundered sugar and bananas from the Americas. Some say its origins lie in a work song of Georgia’s Sea Islands. This three-part a cappella version is gorgeous, and the sisters — who grew up in Little Five Points — say the song helped them connect with their Celtic roots. “In Peia we found a third sister,” Leah and Chloe say on their Facebook page. “Together we learned this song on a sailboat many moons ago. Singing old songs is a richness hard to put to words. A complex and necessary currency. Connecting us to source. To story. To women and lineage and everything passed on and yet to come.”

— Scott Freeman

::

Ron Pope (with Von Grey): “A Little More Love”

Ron Pope began playing guitar growing up in Cobb County, a kid obsessed with the music of Bruce Springsteen. Now based in Nashville, Pope is one of the most successful indie artists around with 13 albums to his credit, most released on his own Brooklyn Basement Records label. His signature song, “A Drop in the Ocean,” has more than 200 million plays on Spotify. On his new single, “A Little More Love,” Pope teams with another metro sister band: Von Grey from Johns Creek. The Von Grey sisters hit it big in 2013 when they debuted on The Late Show With David Letterman. Pope’s world-weary voice is an exquisite blend with Von Grey, and his lyrics show depth and awareness. His latest album is titled Bone Structure

— Scott Freeman

::

Widespread Panic: “Porch Song”

Drummer Todd Nance, a founding member of Widespread Panic, died Wednesday in Athens “from sudden and unexpectedly severe complications of a chronic illness.” Nance, 57, played with the band for 30 years before taking a hiatus in 2014 and leaving permanently in 2016. The group began as a duo with John Bell and Mikey Houser. They had a gig one night that required a drummer, and Houser tracked down Nance, a friend from high school. Band members credit that night as the group’s birth. “Todd was the engine of Widespread Panic,” the band said in a statement. This version of Widespread Panic favorite “Porch Song,” our vintage track of the week, comes from the band’s appearance on Austin City Limits on October 31, 2000, (note the pumpkins and cobwebs onstage).

— Scott Freeman

::

In times like these, when we are separated by necessity, ArtsATL is needed more than ever. Please consider a donation so we can continue to highlight Atlanta’s creative community.

 

STAY UP TO DATE ON
ALL THINGS ArtsATL